Author: singlebabyboomers

A Single Baby Boomer Survives Hurricane Michael

A Single Baby Boomer Survives Hurricane Michael

 

Residents of the Florida Panhandle say that hurricanes are the price we pay for living in Paradise.  Most of the time we don’t give hurricanes much thought.  We buy water and supplies just in case we lose power and water but we forget or ignore what other hurricanes have done.  We send money to those affected by the storms but don’t believe it’ll ever happen to us.  We’ve seen the effects of Global Warming and heard the dire warnings but we live in denial.  Then it hits.

For video go to https://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2018/10/10/hurricane-michael-orig-acl.cnn/video/playlists/hurricane-michael/

 

I’d given up watching the news for the weekend because of all of the gut-wrenching testimony in the Kavanagh hearing.  My doctor had even suggested that I may have anxiety issues affecting my sleep so when a phone call from my friend woke me up on Monday before Hurricane Michael I was surprised the hear we were in its path.  We debated what we would do and decided to go to a town an hour north since she could stay with a relative there.  My other friends were smarter and headed west.

 

 

The morning of Hurricane Michael when I awoke at 10 am there was a message saying that her kids had made her leave much early.  I decided to stay put since it was getting too late to outrun the fast-moving storm that had been upgraded to a possible Category 5 Hurricane when it hit the Panhandle.  It hit my hotel as a Category 2, but my town, Panama City, was right in the path.  After a night alone with my cat, I discovered there was still no power or cell service.  I started out to look for gas. Gas was not to be found but I got cell service farther west and was able to book a room in Montgomery, AL.  I decided I had to turn around and not waste any more gas.  A gentleman gave me a cooler for my ice and another told me that I could call on him for help.  Since Panama City was in turmoil and they weren’t letting anyone back.  Tired and frightened I drove toward Alabama with my cat and was thrilled to see the lights on at a gas station so I could fill up.  Exhausted from lack of sleep for three nights, I pulled into Montgomery and was thrilled to find the comfortable Drury Inn that allowed my cat to stay and even gave me free dinner, drinks, and breakfast.  It was full of refugees from Hurricane Michael.

A ballgame with some of my family relieved the stress.

The next day kitty and I were back on the road on our way to Chattanooga where I was fortunate to find a relative who had room for my cat and me.  I spent a week visiting with my family since I couldn’t get back to my condo and then I was lucky enough to have a friend who was going out of town and would let us stay in her home.  She was glad to have someone there since there were looters roaming the area.  Panama City Beach, where she lived, just got the edge of the storm so her house was unharmed.  I’ll never be able to repay her enough for her generosity.   Later my owners let me stay in their RV near Dothan, AL.  I was thankful to have a place to stay that was much better than most displaced people.

Two months later when I finally was able to go back to my condo on St. Andrew’s Bay.  After the hurricane we had a boat in our yard, a filthy pool, windows smashed and trees snapped in half.  We didn’t get power for two weeks and then big dehumidifiers sucked out the moisture to avoid black mold and raised the temperature to over 100 degrees.  The elevator didn’t work for almost a month but we were still some of the lucky ones.

There’s a boat in my yard.

 

Our carports

 

Most of my bedroom and closets on my bed.

 

Hall ceiling

 

Livingroom

 

If you look at the photos of my neighborhood, The Cove, you’ll see the devastation even after several weeks of clean-up.   Mexico Beach and Tyndall Air Force Base were virtually blown away.  Every time I went back to my condo I took a different route and each time my stomach was queasy by the time I got there.  There were houses with trees through their roofs that FEMA considered livable.  My FEMA inspector told me of a 90-year-old woman sitting in a destroyed home with her two developmentally delayed adults grandsons.  He called a crisis center to help them.  New parents went two hours away to deliver their baby and came back to a shelter.  They said it was so bad they decided to stay in their truck in a Walmart parking lot.  Security found them and got them a room for two weeks where employees were staying.  One of those security guards gave me a hug in a DQ when I thanked them for coming from their home states to help us.  There was an enormous police presence.  State Troopers were everywhere to help.  Restaurants served disaster workers and victims food.  There were food and supply stations set up in many areas.  Youth and other volunteers groups came in from all over North America. The lady who worked at the destroyed lab where I have my blood tests gave me her cell phone number in case I needed a blood test.  Power companies sent workers from all over the U.S.   I’ve never seen so many people offering services to those in need.  FEMA helped many people but people are still waiting for help.  Finally, some of the promised trailers arrived. A retired couple without insurance got $3000 for their destroyed mobile home that was worth $30,000+.  Tent cities sprung up in parking lots and parks. One was later bulldozed after the CDC was called when a bacterial infection broke out.  The victims were taken by bus to shelters in other cities or left to find another place to stay.  Three power workers were killed by a car while repairing power lines.  In one community it took residents five days to cut their way out to help.  Where I live in the Cove a few blocks from Panama City it took four days.  Sick people had to be airlifted out.  One of our hospitals was so damaged only a quarter of it will reopen so 800 people are laid off.  Five hundred people lost their jobs when the mall closed.  The schools reported 3,800 students are homeless.  Eighty percent of buildings are destroyed or severely damaged.  Seventy-five percent of the trees are lost.  There were forty-five storm-related deaths.  These are just a few of the sad stories I heard. 

 

 

There are people who will say that those in excavation zones should have left.  I’m among them but I still feel their pain and understand they may have had good reasons for staying.  Some just waited too long expecting Michael to turn or downgrade like Hurricane Harvey and were told the day of the hurricane it was too late to go.  Most of us, like me, didn’t go far enough away because we wanted to get back to clean up after the storm.

3 weeks after the hurricane in Cove

 

Downtown Panama City

 

So many roofs damaged.

 

Boats were blown against the drawbridge.

 

Debris in Panama City Marina

 

Panama City Marina

 

Pulling boats out of the bayou

 

Retrieving boats from the Bay

 

The sea surge moved sidewalks

 

Torn out by the roots by the wind

 

This is what’s left of someone’s home.

Soon the volunteers will be gone and we’ll be on our own like the victims of Hurricanes Maria, Harvey, Florence and others.  We’ll be better off than the people in Puerto Rico but we have years of rebuilding ahead of us.  Since the beach was spared, tourism will flourish there again but our businesses and marinas just a few miles away are in ruins.  Panama City has more residents in lower socio-economic groups who’ll have to wait for help that may not come and so like the victims of Hurricane Katrina will leave.  Some can’t come back and businesses that are up and running are closing early and looking for workers.  Who will fill those jobs?  School didn’t start until November 12th so there’ll be much to make up before the useless but required standardized testing.  All of these and many other things are results of Hurricane Michael and there will be more to come.

These smiles show hope for the Florida Panhandle’s recovery.

 

Christmas decor and winter flowers with a fire pit in the back.

So remember when you see a natural disaster in the media and then the next news cycle comes up with a new story, the survivors are still suffering and need your help.

 

Thank you to all of you who have helped us.  We appreciate it and will remember how you cared for us.  The people of the Florida Panhandle will pay it forward when a disaster hits others.  As the saying goes, you can make lemonade out of lemons as I did from lemons I found on a downed tree.  I believe we’ve learned a lot that will help us in the future.

 

Continue the adventure!

Linda Lea

A Single Baby Boomer Spends April in Paris

A Single Baby Boomer Spends April in Paris

 

April in Paris

“I never knew the charm of spring

I never met it face to face

I never knew my heart could sing

I never missed a warm embrace

Till April in Paris, chestnuts in blossom

Holiday tables under the trees

April in Paris, this is a feeling

That no one can ever reprise

I never knew the charm of spring

I never met it face to face

I never knew my heart could sing

I never missed a warm embrace

Till April in Paris

Whom can I run to

What have you done to my heart”

Songwriters: E. Y. Harburg / Vernon Duke

April In Paris lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Shapiro Bernstein & Co. Inc.

April in Paris is indeed as charming as the song says.  The weather is balmy.  Everything is in bloom and the beauty of the city sparkles during the day and twinkles at night.  The tourist attractions aren’t as crowded as during the summer and the cafes don’t have a line of people waiting for a table even near places like the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower.  Americans have a false belief that the French are snooty but my friend and I didn’t encounter that at all.  They were helpful and cheerful but then we always treated them with respect and weren’t demanding.  We tried to use as much French as we could muster and they obliged us by using English.  As one waiter told us, he needed a smattering of many languages in his job.  I think Americans would do well to do the same.  Paris is home to many immigrants who have acclimated to their new country and are willing to work long hours in the stands and tourist stalls that dot the city.

We tried to visit the smaller cafes and have the plat du jour.  We were happy with the prices and the interesting dishes.  I was surprised at one that featured what I thought was a serving of fish with mashed potatoes but when it came ended up being a casserole of fish bits and potatoes.  It was tasty but then anything drenched in butter, as is common there, is rarely bad.  I was determined to eat as much duck as possible and succeeded in my effort.  I wish we had it on the menu in the U.S. more often.  I recommend crepes for a quick treat and of course, anything from a bakery is to die for.  I don’t know why we can’t get a crispy baguette in the grocery stores the states.  We had a bakery by our front gate, a luxury I don’t have at home. I can’t give you any recommendations when it comes to the nightlife.  I’m one of the older Baby Boomers but everywhere we went there were clubs I’m sure were hopping all night.  We did walk by the Moulin Rouge one evening and the lights themselves were very impressive.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Metro and buses were easy to use.  We used Google Maps to navigate both systems and didn’t have a problem.  My friend had already been in the city for a couple of weeks and we’d spent a year using subways in Japan.  We had experience but it’s easy once you do it a few times.  There are machines to buy tickets and the larger stations have manned booths.  You can use these tickets on both the Metro and buses.  Buses take longer but they’re a good way to see some of the city for a small price.

 

I’d been to Paris before but wasn’t able to visit the Louvre so we spent several hours there.  I thought it would take the whole day but the main museum is not that big.  The top floor with the Mona Lisa and Venus De Milo was hot and crowded but the rest was easy to navigate.  I’d have liked to see more of the gardens but it was quite hot so we opted to visit the shops inside.  There’s a Metro stop right in the building housing the museum so it’s easy to get there.  Don’t miss this when you go to Paris but also take in the many other museums and attractions in the area.  We also visited the Rodin Museum.  Just the garden alone was worth the price of a ticket.

Louve map

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Even though I’ve been up in the Eiffel Tower, I wanted to visit the area again.  At 1,063 feet tall the tower is the tallest structure in Paris.  Just being there is the quintessential Paris experience.  The wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel.  Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World’s Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France’s leading artists and intellectuals for its design but is now a global cultural icon of France and the most-visited paid monument in the world.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We took a boat ride down the Seine under all the historic bridges and past Notre-Dame.  The next day we visited the famous cathedral and Sainte-Chapelle which was erected in the mid-13th century by King Louis IX. The chapel features some of the period’s stain glass, a total of 15 glass panels and a prominent large window.  Notre Dame Cathedral, arguably the most stunning gothic cathedral in the world, was conceived in the 12th century and completed in the 14th. It was the very heartbeat of medieval Paris. After a period of neglect, it recaptured the popular imagination when Victor Hugo immortalized it in “The Hunchback of Notre Dame”.  The back portions with the flying buttresses are currently being refurbished but the area was still charming enough to be a backdrop for photo shoots and wedding pictures.  We also saw couples being photographed at several Paris tourist attractions. We also did some shopping on the Left Bank near Notre Dame.  The flower shops had magnificent blooms that I wanted to bring home but I had to be satisfied with dried lavender which now makes my drawers smell heavenly.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Arc de Triomphe is another tourist must see as is the neighboring high-end shopping area of the Avenue des Champs-Élysées.  The Arc de Triomphe honors those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner and outer surfaces. Beneath its vault lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Our Paris Greeter took us on a tour of her home market near the Champs-Elysee  We were enthralled by the variety of delectable food available to the Parisians at their small local markets.  Click on the Ballade link below to see the places we visited and learn about their history.

Ballade_2018_v3

Then there’s the food.

Oh là là!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

I’d love to return some day but life is short and I have so many other places I want to visit.  My next cross Atlantic trip will be to Wales, Scotland and maybe back to Port Issac with my kids.  Back to writing my book and enjoying the St. Andrew’s Bay views from my window.

 

Continue the Adventure!

Linda Lea

A Single Baby Boomer Needs Your Help

A Single Baby Boomer Needs Your Help

 

My grandsons and I are very different. 

They’re men. I’m a woman.

They’re young. I’m old.

They’re tall. I’m short.

They’ve lost their baby fat.  I got mine back.

They were born and live in the South.  I was born in the North and now live in the South.

They’re born athletes. I only like sports if they’re playing or watching beside me.

They like video games.  I like Facebook and TV.

They like to text.  I like to talk to them.

They have black curly hair and brown eyes.  I have straight white hair and green eyes.

I’m white.  They’re multiracial.

Only the last difference makes me worry about them every day.  The news is full of unarmed black people being shot by the police and people “standing their ground” even when they’re not committing crimes.  It didn’t start with Trayvon Martin.  It’s been going on for centuries all over the world.  From slavery to apartheid those perceived as different have been persecuted.

black people killed

https://policeviolencereport.org/  Statistics from 2017

I’m not saying that everyone feels this way.  It’s quite the opposite.  There are white people of all socio-economic classes who believe we’re all equal but how many of them speak out?  I have a small voice but I’m begging you.  Please help people of color and those with sexual preferences and religions other than our own.  We’d all like to sleep at night and know that our babies are safe from prejudice and harm.

Most importantly though, my grandsons and I are alike for the most important reason.

We love each other.

Continue the Adventure!

Linda Lea

Some Baby Boomer Humor About British TV

Some Baby Boomer Humor About British TV

 

I found this on The Inspector Morse, Lewis and Endeavour Appreciation Society Facebook page.  I thought you all might enjoy it.  I use closed captioning even though I don’t have an issue with my hearing.  Any accent different from our own is difficult to understand.  When I taught in Japan there were students from over 30 countries at my school.  I was amazed they could understand all of the English speaking teachers because we came from all over the world.  It was the same with Vaughantown when I taught conversational English to Spaniards.  We had tutors from England, Scotland, Wales, New Zealand, Trinidad and different parts of the U.S.  I feel it’s important to do our best to try to understand and appreciate the differences in people from other countries especially those who came here to make America their home.  A positive step toward this is to learn words from their language.  You’ll find many English words are derived from other languages.  Learning another language keeps our brain active.  We definitely need to do that as we age.   This cartoon gave me a chuckle though.  Share it with others.

 


40441564_10156063553683285_6516803828690452480_n

690452480_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=d1f3687f5a39666b1c60b46e5d4c441e&oe=5C35D0C9

 

Continue the Adventure!

Linda Lea

A Single Baby Boomers Magical British Mystery Tour

A Single Baby Boomers Magical British Mystery Tour

I’ve always loved the Sherlock Holmes novels by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and I’m an avid fan of the British TV and movie detective genre, in particular, the Morse, Lewis and Endeavor Series which were written by Colin Dexter.  I tried to plan my own tour with a tour company for a group but ran into several roadblocks so I planned it with a friend. See my blog https://singleboomerlife.com/2017/06/04/single-baby-boomers-need-a-goal/ for how planning my trip became a positive short-term goal.

 

After a week in Paris, my friend and I took the Eurostar under the English Channel to London and then a train to Oxford, the fictional home of the equally fictional murder-ridden University city.  I wasn’t disappointed.  From the moment we got off the train it was like I was in the middle of a mystery.  The first part involved finding our Airbnb.  Since I have no sense of direction and am a poor listener we headed in the wrong direction.  A friendly University student pointed us in the right direction so we rolled our bags down the street, past the Thames to our 2nd-floor room.  I was happy I’d opted for a carryon and a backpack but my friend had been in Paris for 3 weeks and had a much larger suitcase.  It took both of us to get it up the narrow stairs.  We Americans are used to having everything supersized so when we travel to other countries the size of everything is an adjustment for us.  However, the smaller food serving portions are a much healthier choice.

20180427_180609
The Thames

After we got settled, we went in search of my first Morse Pub, The Kings Arms.  I told the bartender that I had waited years to say, “Please give me a bitter.”  He welcomed me to Oxford and handed me my first half pint (I had to pace myself.  We were there 3 days and I’m a lightweight.)  As I savored my drink and meat pie, I looked at the familiar artifacts from the Morse TV Series and breathed in the rarified air of Oxford University.  I felt like I’d died and gone to detective heaven.  After dinner, we walked around several of the 38 colleges that compose the University.  I was surprised to find out that no matter which college you attended you take the same final exam, are considered a graduate of Oxford University and attended its graduation ceremony.  During our visit, we encountered students wearing their robes to exams and graduates of the Masters Program with caps and gowns just after their graduation ceremony.

An undergraduate student at the University of Oxford in subfusc for matriculation.

Academic dress is required for examinations, matriculation, disciplinary hearings, and when visiting university officers. A referendum held amongst the Oxford student body in 2015 showed 76% against making it voluntary in examinations – 8,671 students voted, with the 40.2% turnout the highest ever for a UK student union referendum. (Wikipedia)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I always like to get the lay of the land so the next day we took the Hop-on-Hop-off Bus for a city tour and then got off at Christ Church to see the grounds.  We couldn’t go into the church because there was a special event.  Little did we know that the members of all three series were inside for a memorial for the author Colin Dexter who passed away the preceding year.  When I learned about it the next day from our tour director, I was so disappointed.  Some of the participants had seen cast members and I was having a drink in the Morse Bar in The Randolph Hotel that very day.  She did share some interesting insights with us from one of the cast and an important member of the creative team.  It seems that the actor who played Hathaway in the Lewis series, Laurence Fox, said that a series about his character could be getting off the back burner.  It may be filmed after the current series about the young Morse, Endeavor, is over.  If you’re a fan you should check out Chris Sullivan’s blog at https://morseandlewisandendeavour.com/.  He spoke at the memorial and is a real authority on all of the series.  If you visit Oxford, I would also recommend the Inspector Morse and Lewis Walking Tour.  You can book through Viator,  at other sites and the Visitors Center.  You can watch full episodes of Inspector Morse, Lewis, and Endeavor on YouTube.  I guarantee you will enjoy them.

20180426_125544
Christ Church

Of all the pubs we visited from the three series I thought The Trout Inn was the nicest.  Located in Wolvercote, just a short bus ride from Oxford, it was the location of the episode The Wolvercote Tongue.  Since it was a cold day,  I treated myself to an Irish Coffee and the Sticky Crispy Duck Salad.  Just thinking about it makes my mouth water.  I also stopped in the White Horse and had an interesting chat with the bartender and a regular.  We ate dinner at the Eagle and Child.  I chose the Beef Bone Marrow Pie since it sounded interesting and I have to say, it was delicious especially when paired with a half pint of bitter.  It was a favorite watering hole of C.S. Lewis who held academic positions at both Oxford and Cambridge Universities.  He’s best known for his works of fiction, The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space.  He was often joined there by his drinking buddy, J.R.R. Tolkien, an English writer, poet, philologist, university professor, and the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. I’d have loved to have visited all of the pubs but 3 days wasn’t enough.  I’d like to return and take a summer class.  Several of the colleges offer programs for adults and high school students where you can stay on campus and enjoy the real Oxford experience.

1_oxford_aerial_panorama_2016
Aerial view of Oxford University (Wikipedia)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

20180426_134210

We had our own Afternoon Tea party after visiting Alice’s Shop which features author Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland themed souvenirs.   See http://aliceshop.co.uk/about/.  The sumptuous tea was more than enough for two.

While my friend went to Evening Song at one of the colleges, I went on Bill Spectre’s Ghost Trails which has a 5-star rating on Trip Advisor and is one of the top 10 ghost tours in the world. I highly recommend it.  This was one of his many sleights of hand tricks.  He also let us try it on ourselves.

I left Oxford sooner than I wanted and took the train to London where I met a local guide for a personal tour of the Marylebone section of London. The service was free, very enjoyable and informative. My tour guide sent me the summary below. https://londongreeters.org/your-tour

Here are a few notes from the walk around Marylebone. The area expanded along with the other areas of Westminster following the Great Plague and the Fire in 1666. You have a picture of the Sherlock Homes statue by John Doubleday. You have a photograph of Sherlock Holmes but here is another piece of work from the same sculptor.

After getting the tickets to the Museum we went under the Marylebone road via the Wonderpass to 94 Baker Street which was once the home of the Apple Boutique. Here is what it would have looked like.

apple

The next stop was Paddington Street gardens which has a little statue of an Orderly Boy who is forever polishing his shoes. Orderly boys were road Sweepers during the Victorian era. Paddington Street Gardens was a burial ground before it was opened as a public garden by Princess Louise in 1886, and laid out by Fanny Wilkinson the first female professional landscape gardener.

orderly boy

Running alongside the gardens are Ossington buildings and Garbutt place. This, once known as “little hell” is where the social reformer Octavia Hill started her work. Financed by John Ruskin she went on to manage 3,000 families. She is also known as the founder of the National Trust which has been largely responsible for the preservation of green spaces.

Octavia Hill

My next stop was Harley Street where Florence Nightingale worked as a nurse in a hospital for gentlewomen. It was from here that she left for the Crimea and oversaw the hospitals in Scutari in 1854 when she became known as the Lady with the Lamp.

Florence Nightingale

We then went to Station 39 in Wentworth Mews and had a look at the properties that were once used for stables and would have been the home to staff employed by the hoses they backed on to. Here is the sort of coach they would have housed which would have set you back £60,000 in today’s values.  It was from this mews that many women volunteered during the Second World War as ambulance drivers.

coach

I then took you to Portland Place, home of the BBC and RIBA. Both are art deco buildings built using Portland stone. RIBA was built by Grey Wornum, a WWI veteran who lost an eye at the Battle of the Somme. It was inspired by a visit to Stockholm where he visited the Town Hall. Between the two buildings, we stopped to look at the stature of Quintin Hogg, the Philanthropist who donated his life to the building of Ragged Schools.

20180429_115000.jpg

RIBA
RIBA

quitin
Quintin Hogg

Next door to the BBC is the only Church built by John Nash who is more famous for the Regency Terraces that surround Regent’s park. It’s a controversial piece of work, because of the mixture of Greek and Gothic styles. Across the road is where Conan Doyle and Oscar Wilde met at the Langham Hotel.

langham
Langham Hotel

We then went onto Cavendish Square via Chandos Street, so named because of Chandos House at the end, one of the few surviving houses built by Robert Adam. It was the home of the Duke of Chandos who lends his name to the Chandos portrait of William Shakespeare which was the portrait that started the collection that now is housed in the National Portrait Gallery. Also in Chandos street is one of the oldest medical societies in the World – The Medical Society.

shakespeare

 

And I finished off in Cavendish Square and showed you the Jacob Epstein sculpture of the Madonna and Child that sits between the two buildings on the north side of the square that was once a convent.

madonna

And that was Marylebone. I hope you found it interesting. There is a rich assortment of architectural styles that start off with the Palladian influences through Georgian and Victorian styles, finishing with the Art Deco buildings on Portland Place.

I worked in as many authors that I could including Conan Doyle obviously, but also JM Barrie, AA Milne, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde and George Orwell. There are many others.

 

After the tour, I visited the Sherlock Holmes Museum with hundreds of tourist from around the world. http://www.sherlock-holmes.co.uk/  After waiting in line for an hour, Mrs. Watson, his landlady, started our tour with a visit to his study and then let us roam the rest of the house where we viewed period pieces and vignettes of some of his most interesting cases.  It amazed me that so many people pay to visit the home of a fictional character in a location that isn’t even 221B Baker Street but I patiently waited in line with the other Holmes devotees too and wouldn’t have missed it for the world.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The following day I was off on a tour to Devonshire, Cornwall, and the Cotswolds.  It was a small group, only four women, three of us from the U.S. and one from Australia so we were able to ask a lot of questions.  This tour had fewer frills than other more expensive ones I’d been on.  It was a variation on a Hop-on-Hop-off tour of the countryside with personalized narration and traveler-guide interaction.  I opted for the Bed and Breakfast option and didn’t regret it for a moment.  The breakfasts were outstanding, the room more spacious than my previous hotel rooms and the service excellent.  The view of the English Channel at the Cornwall B&B was amazing and better than the hotel view the other guest had.  We toured in a Mercedes Passenger Coach and traveled the backroads so as to see the sites larger buses couldn’t reach.  Two of the travelers arranged with the guide to see places where their ancestors lived.  I was excited to walk the moors near the historic Dartmoor Prison where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle got his inspiration so Sherlock Holmes could meet up with the Hound of the Baskervilles.  I found there were several monster legends in the area such as the Legend of the Hairy Hands in which something seems to take over the vehicle’s steering wheel and drive it off the road and the Beast of Dartmoor. Here’s a possible explanation for the Beast. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/21/beast-of-bodmin-mystery-solved-as-dartmoor-zoo-released-pumas-in/.  Pixies are also said to live in both Devonshire and Cornwall. Pixie (also pixy, pixi, pizkie, piskie and pigsie as it is sometimes known in Cornwall) is a mythical creature of folklore who can be both mischevious and helpful. Pixies are thought to be concentrated in the high moorland areas around Devon and Cornwall, suggesting some Celtic origin for the belief and name.  They’re believed to inhabit ancient underground ancestor sites such as stone circles, barrows, dolmens, ringforts or menhirs.  The story The 3 Little Pigs was originally written about pixies.  Read the report at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixie.  It’s a lot of fun.  See https://www.visitdartmoor.co.uk/explore-dartmoor/arts-and-literature/folklore for more information.  See  https://www.go-tours.co.uk/cornwall-and-the-cotswolds-tour/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwu_jYBRD8ARIsAC3EGCKqDBVluadxyjc0_SUrV7mwLqsrFOKqs9KpnzC_ZNoibRuVJG1XbmUaApNpEALw_wcB

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We visited many scenic seaside villages in Devonshire and Cornwall including the filming site for Poldark and my bucket list item, Port Isaac aka Port Wenn, the village where Doc Martin is filmed.  From the photos, you’ll see that it’s as beautiful as it appears in the show.  The residents are very friendly even though their idyllic home is inundated with tourist during filming and from what I could see, year round.  Doc Martin, played by Martin Clunes, is much loved all over the world even though he plays a surly doctor who doesn’t suffer fools in a village of eccentrics.  Here’s hoping there’s another season.  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Martin.  While these are not mystery series, they’re brilliant examples of the genius of British drama.  In my opinion, these mysteries and dramas are more thought-provoking than those on American TV.  If you’re interested you should also watch Midsummer Murders, Foyles War, Prime Suspect, Sherlock, Vera, Father Brown and a host of others on Netflix, Acorn, and Britbox.  Some are no longer in productions but both Brits and Americans often lobby for spinoffs and reboots.  Many of our most popular programs were created in the UK.  Their sense of humor is fantastic.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Take a look at this episode.  I didn’t realize this was on YouTube.   I’m going to look for more things there rather than paying for streaming services.  I can watch it on my TV with Comcast/Xfinity.

Next time I’ll tell you about my adventures in Gay Paree.  Until then…

 

Continue the Adventure

 

Linda Lea

 

 

 

 

A Single Baby Boomer Wants to Feel Motivated

A Single Baby Boomer Wants to Feel Motivated

 

Before I retired I was motivated by different things.

  1. Providing emotional, physical and monetary support for my family.

sibs

2. Furthering my education

grad3. Personal and career development and advancement

 

personal growth

4. Community Service

volunteer

5. Adventure seeking which led to learning to fly, travel and moving from my hometown, state and for a year, my country

 

 

IMG_1342
Hot air ballooning in Australia

 

 

6. Meeting new people and making new friends everywhere I lived or visited

20171122_131450
Vaughantown friends

7. Saving for retirement

1retire

8. Love

love

Today I’m still motivated by most of the same things but when I retired I lost interest in some of the things that once energized me.  I have a pension and social security so making money isn’t important.  I don’t need a large place to live or many possessions. However, I seem to accumulate new things wherever I go even though I’d cleaned out most of them when I moved to Japan and later the beach.

 

When I retired I said I was never going to get up until I was ready.  Now I sometimes stay in bed watching TV or listening to audiotapes until late morning.  I try to schedule my appointments in the afternoon,  attend meetings later in the day and only make exceptions if absolutely necessary unless I’m traveling, of course.  After my last move, I started going to the Senior Center to make friends and learn how to make stained glass ornaments.  While I enjoyed it, I didn’t make any lasting friends in my new home until two ladies took pity on me and invited me to join a weight loss organization.  There I found support and a circle of friends whom I can call on for entertainment, advice, and help.

 

A couple of years ago I was disgusted with myself for never finishing the novels I’d started.  At the suggestion of another blogger and life coach, I started this blog which I hoped would become a book.  While there are many books, articles, and blogs written for Baby Boomers and singles there are not many that address just single Baby Boomers.  I thought this would be my niche and it has been until I decided that I wanted to travel more and write a work of fiction.  So I traveled and I wrote about my travels but my blog posts got fewer and farther between.  The good news is that I’m about a quarter of the way through my book, Sedona Star, but I still feel that I should be doing something for my community.

 

My friend suggested that I be a Guardian ad Litem.  I’d visit children who’d been taking from their parents due to abuse or neglect and report my findings to the court.  My family who’d lived through my experiences in my job and personal life thought it was a bad idea, but I persevered until the Parkland School shootings.  I’d been threatened with death while working in schools and had other harrowing experiences so I decided they were right.  I felt like a quitter but I also knew that as I aged I didn’t have the same physical and emotional strength I had when I was younger.

Still, I felt like I needed to do something other than go out with family and friends, exercise, travel and write my book.  I’d like to say I found that something but I’m still searching.  I did join the March for our Lives for new gun laws to protect our children and I’m watching the news so I can be better informed before the midterm elections.  Somehow it doesn’t seem like enough.  I wish I had some answers for others who need motivation.  I’ve written about it on my blog but I still struggle with it myself.  One blog that may interest you is https://singleboomerlife.com/2016/01/10/single-baby-boomers-have-you-found-your-passion/

 

quest

My question for myself and you is:

After a life of working toward your goals and achieving most of what you need and want, is it all right to just concentrate on what makes you happy if you’re not hurting anyone else?

 

So are the experts who tell us that we need to keep working and be involved in the community to stay emotionally and physically healthy right or can we now be what I used to consider selfish?

50338152baf73f4983debf3a95f54874

If you have any thoughts, please share them with my readers and me.  As for me, I’m off to Paris, Oxford, and southern England.  I may not be making a contribution to society, but it’ll be a learning experience for me and hopefully the people with whom I interact. Also,  one more thing will be checked off my Bucket List.  Stay tuned.

 

Continue the adventure.

Linda Lea

A Single Baby Boomer Dances Through Spain

A Single Baby Boomer Dances Through Spain

 

Since I’ve lived in the U.S. most of my life, but have grandparents who immigrated from Europe, I’ve always been interested in my European roots.  Our recorded history is relatively brief in the States compared to other parts of the world so we have to go to another continent to find how our ancestors lived.

 

Spain or in Spanish, España, is a European country mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula.  It also includes two large archipelagoes, the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea and the Canary Islands off the African Atlantic coast, two cities, Ceuta and Melilla, on the African mainland and several small islands in the Alboran Sea near the African coast. The mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with Gibraltar, to the north and northeast by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay and to the west and northwest by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean. It’s the only European country to have a border with an African country, Morocco. It’s the fourth largest country in the European continent. By population, Spain is the sixth largest in Europe.  Major urban areas include Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Bilbao, and Málaga. It’s a parliamentary democracy and constitutional monarchy with King Felipe VI as head of state.

 

Modern humans first arrived in Spain and Portugal around 35,000 years ago. Iberian cultures along with ancient Phoenician, Greek, and Carthaginian settlements developed on the peninsula until it came under Roman rule around 200 BC when it was renamed Hispania. At the end of the Western Roman Empire, Germanic tribal confederations invaded the Iberian Peninsula.  Eventually, the Visigoths would integrate by force all remaining independent territories in the peninsula into the Kingdom of Toledo.  The Visigothic kingdom fell to the Moors except in the north where Spain emerged as a unified country in the 15th century under the Catholic Monarchs. Spain became one of history’s first global empires, leaving a vast cultural and linguistic legacy that includes over 500 million Spanish speakers, the world’s second most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.

 

While there are many sites of interest in all of the cities on my tour I’m going to concentrate on the places I visited in this blog.

 

Madrid

Madrid is the capital of Spain and its largest municipality. The city has almost 3.166 million inhabitants with a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.5 million. It is the third-largest city in the European Union after London and Berlin and lies on the River Manzanares in the center of the country.  As the capital city of Spain, the seat of government, and residence of the Spanish monarch, Madrid is also the political, economic and cultural center of the country.

IMG_1919
Madrid City Center

IMG_1917
Street vendors

IMG_1938
Crosswalk entertainment

IMG_1944
Police demonstrating for higher play

When I arrived in Madrid in November I only had a couple of days to recover from my jet lag and investigate the area around my hotel so I took a Hop-on Hop-off bus tour through the downtown area.  I find this gives me the most information and allows me to decide which sites to visit if I have limited time.

 

Since I stayed near the Royal Palace of Madrid (Palacio Real de Madrid) I decided to visit this and the surrounding area which included the Opera house, Almudena Cathedral and The Plaza de Oriente with its gardens and monuments.  The palace is the official residence of Felipe VI of Spain that’s only used for official acts. It’s a baroque palace full of artworks and is one of the largest European royal palaces.  I visited before the U.S. Thanksgiving and there was a 20-minute wait for tickets and to get through security so you may want to buy tickets online before you go.  It was well worth the wait to see its luxurious rooms and rich collections of armor and weapons, pharmaceuticals, silverware, watches, paintings, tapestries, and the most comprehensive collection of Stradivarius in the world.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The next day in the dark wee hours of the morning I sat in a deserted garage 2 levels under the Plaza de Oriente waiting for my tour bus entering a text on my phone telling my son my last location in case I wasn’t ever seen again.  Luckily, I didn’t have to hit send since someone from the tour finally appeared and I got on a bus filled with Spanish speakers.  The guide assured me the tour would be in both languages but I was happy to meet another single woman from Honduras who spoke English.  She hadn’t visited the bus stop the day before and almost missed the bus looking for the entrance to the garage until she asked the Royal Palace guards where she could find the bus.

 

Tip:  If you’re in a new place, especially one where you don’t know the language, know where you’re going well before you need to be there.  Taxis and other shuttles aren’t expensive in Spain, so use these if it’s dark or you don’t feel comfortable with buses and trains.  Even if you’re on a budget, you should take these modes of transportation when you’re on a schedule or dragging luggage.  We deserve to spoil ourselves and stay safe.

Cáceres

Our first stop on the tour was Cáceres the capital of Cáceres province.  The medieval walled city has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The Old Town (Parte Antigua) still has its ancient walls.  This part of town is also well known for its multitude of storks’ nests. The walls contain a medieval town setting with no outward signs of modernity, which is why many television shows and films have been shot there. During the tour, we learned many filmmakers used the backdrop of Spain for their movies. Click on this to see a slideshow of Royalty and film stars who visited the sites I saw in Spain.https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/exhibit/TgLSYAV-1VEAIg

 

The small streets in the historical center have many small shops selling typical products. The convents sell homemade sweets and pastries. Typical wines from Extremadura are affordable, full-bodied reds. Local liqueurs include cherry liqueur from the nearby Jerte Valley and other original liqueurs such as chestnut and blackberry. Other produce in the Province includes sheep’s cheese or Torta del Casar, fig cake, chestnuts, hams and other pork products, lamb, game, olive oil, paprika, fried breadcrumbs (migas), trout, pastries, and honey. I had the blood sausage, migas, and eggs for breakfast.  The only thing I recommend is the eggs.  On the other hand, I bought sheep’s cheese in Belmonte and it’s delicious.

 

Córdoba

Córdoba is called Cordova in English.  It’s a city in Andalusia, southern Spain, and the capital of the province of Córdoba. It was a Roman settlement which was later colonized by Muslim armies in the eighth century. It became the capital of the Islamic Emirate and then of the Caliphate of Córdoba which included most of the Iberian Peninsula. Córdoba consisted of hundreds of workshops that created goods such as silk. It was a center of culture and learning in the Muslim golden age.  Today it’s a moderately sized modern city with a population in 2014 of about 799,400.  The historic center was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site because it has the second largest Old town in Europe.  The most important building and symbol of the city, the Great Mosque of Córdoba and current cathedral and the Roman bridge, are the city’s best-known features. The Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba whose ecclesiastical name is the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption is regarded as one of the most accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture.

 

Tip:  There are many beautiful ceilings in all of the buildings we toured.  Don’t do what I did and walk backward looking up in the dark while taking a photo.  Even though I looked before I stepped, the old floor and the new one were not flush and I fell backward.  My phone survived and so did I, but I almost gave the two guides a heart attack and barely missed hitting something that jutted out of the wall.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

According to a traditional account, a small temple of Christian Visigoth origin, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site.  In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered the construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. Córdoba returned to Christian rule in 1236 and the building was converted to a Roman Catholic church, culminating in the insertion of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the 16th century.  This seems to be a commonplace occurrence in Spain as I’ve seen the same takeovers by the Catholic Church in many other cities.  Since the early 2000s, Spanish Muslims have lobbied the Catholic Church to allow them to pray in the cathedral. This Muslim campaign has been rejected on multiple occasions, both by the church authorities in Spain and by the Vatican.

 

Near the cathedral is the old Jewish quarter, which consists of many irregular streets and is home to the Synagogue and the Sephardic House. In the extreme southwest of the Old Town is the Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos, a former royal property and the seat of the Inquisition.  Adjacent to it are the Royal Stables, where Andalusian horses are bred. The medieval Baths of the Caliphate are near the walls. South of the Old town and east of the great cathedral, in the Plaza del Potro, is the Posada del Potro, a row of inns mentioned in literary works including Don Quixote which remained active until 1972.

 

Tip:  Beware of pickpockets in the crowded narrow streets of old towns anywhere you go.  There are many articles of clothing you can buy to help you hide your valuables.  I bought Columbia shirts because they don’t wrinkle, dry quickly and have hidden pockets.  Search for Columbia PFG Tamiama™ II Long Sleeve Shirt for deals.  I also have a small purse that holds my phone, money, and passport under my clothing.  It’s also handy when you want your hands free in airports or stores.

Seville

Seville is the capital and largest city of the province of Seville, Spain. It’s situated on the plain of the Guadalquivir River. The Seville harbor, located about 50 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, is the only river port in Spain. Seville is also the hottest major metropolitan area in geographical Western Europe, with summer average high temperatures of above 95 °F.

 

Seville was founded as the Roman city of Hispalis. It later became known as Ishbiliya after the Muslim conquest in 712 until finally being incorporated into the Christian Kingdom of Castile under Ferdinand III in 1248.  After the discovery of the Americas, Seville became one of the economic centers of the Spanish Empire as its port monopolized the trans-oceanic trade opening a Golden Age of arts and literature. In 1519, Ferdinand Magellan departed from Seville for the first circumnavigation of the Earth.  The 17th century in Seville brought about the most brilliant flowering of the city’s culture.  Later a gradual economic and demographic decline began as silt deposited in the Guadalquivir River forced trade to relocate to the nearby port of Cádiz.  In 1992, coinciding with the fifth centenary of the Discovery of the Americas, the Universal Exposition was held for six months in Seville. For the occasion the local communications network infrastructure was greatly improved, the SE-30 ring road around the city was completed, new highways were constructed and the new Santa Justa train station opened with the Spanish High-Speed Rail system, the Alta Velocidad Española which began to operate between Madrid-Seville. The Seville Airport, (Aeropuerto de Sevilla), was expanded with a new terminal building designed by the architect Rafael Moneo.  The monumental Puente del Alamillo, Alamillo Bridge, over the Guadalquivir, designed by the architect Santiago Calatrava, was built to allow access to the island of La Cartuja, site of the massive exposition. Some of the installations remain at the site after the exposition was converted into the Scientific and Technological Park Cartuja.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Alcázar of Seville is a royal palace originally developed by Moorish Muslim kings. It’s renowned as one of the most beautiful in Spain, being regarded as one of the most outstanding examples of Mudéjar architecture found on the Iberian Peninsula.  The upper levels of the Alcázar are still used by the royal family as the official Seville residence.  It is the oldest royal palace still in use in Europe and was registered in 1987 by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, along with the adjoining Seville Cathedral and the General Archive of the Indies.

 

I was also lucky to attend a performance of the Flamenco in both Seville and Granada.  In its strictest sense, Flamenco is a professionalized art-form based on the various folkloric music traditions of Southern Spain in the communities of Andalusia, Extremadura, and Murcia. In a wider sense, it refers to these musical traditions and more modern musical styles which have themselves been deeply influenced by and become blurred with the development of Flamenco over the past two centuries. It includes cante (singing), toque (guitar playing), baile (dance), jaleo (vocalizations), palmas (handclapping) and pitos (finger snapping).  The oldest record of Flamenco dates to 1774 in the book Las Cartas Marruecas by José Cadalso. The genre originated in the music and dance styles of Andalusia, of much older origin.  Flamenco has also been influenced by the Romani people (Gypsies) in Spain.  However, unlike Romani music in Eastern Europe, its origin and style are uniquely Andalusian.

 

There are many variants of cantes or palos (song forms), each expressing a unique emotion which shares a noticeable resemblance to Indian classical music.  Canta Gitano (Gypsy song) means “profound” and “deep”.  It refers to the original songs believed to be developed by Gypsies who immigrated in the 15th century.  This intense, sad form of cante deals with themes of death, anguish, despair, or religious sentiments may be sung a palo seco (without guitar accompaniment).  It’s believed to be the heart and soul of the Flamenco.  The singer who sings the seguiriyas (the song) leaves in each line of the copla (verse of cante) a piece of his soul and, if not, he is deceiving the listener, perhaps even himself.  It’s said that he sometimes reaches the kind of state of grace the Gypsies call duende (having soul, a heightened state of emotion, expression and authenticity).  The Flamenco I saw in Seville was more like the ones we see in movies, more flashy and entertaining than the intense Flamenco we witnessed in a theater set in a cave in Granada where the Gypsy family has lived for centuries.  The caves were found or dug during a time when the Gypsies first came to Spain. See more pictures of the caves. https://expertvagabond.com/sacromonte-gypsy-caves/

 

Below are videos of both types of Flamenco.

Torremolinos on the Costa del Sol

The Costa del Sol literally, “Coast of the Sun” or “Sun Coast”, is a region in the south of Spain comprising the coastal towns and communities along the coastline of the Province of Málaga.

Historically the provincial population had lived in the fishing villages and in the “white” villages (pueblos blancos) a short distance inland in the mountains running down to the coast. The area was developed to meet the demands of international tourism in the 1950s and has since been a popular destination for foreign tourists not only for its beaches but also for its local culture. Málaga province had been a relatively prosperous commercial and industrial center for most of the 19th century but an economic downturn in the 1880s and 1890s led to the end of the iron industry and weakened the trade and textile industry. The agricultural sector also suffered a deep depression that affected the raising of livestock and all the major crops, especially the cultivation of Vitis vinifera, a grape used for the wine industry.  The social disruption caused by the crisis and its aftermath of job loss, business collapse, and a general economic decline led many residents to consider other means of livelihood. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Baños del Carmen beach was developed and opened in the east of Málaga. The Torremolinos golf course followed in 1928 with hotels and other attractions multiplying after the Spanish American War and World War II.

 

Some of the more famous British criminals fled to the Costa del Sol. It’s sometimes referred to in the UK press as the “Costa del Crime” because they would escape justice at home by moving there to live their lives in luxury. With tense relations between the UK and Spain over Gibraltar, extradition arrangements were not agreed upon until more recently.  In the past, Charlie Wilson, a member of the Great Train Robbery gang,  Anthony Fraser, grandson of Mad Frankie Fraser, and more recently Andrew Moran, an armed robber who escaped custody at his trial lived the high life on the coast of Spain. Another criminal resident was, John Disley nicknamed the “King of Marbella”, who masterminded a £700,000 bank fraud.  Other European criminal entrepreneurs, including Russian and Dutch citizens, have also settled on this coast for the climate and functional advantages for their enterprises, as well as being active investors in the property sector.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Of course, there were many attractions in the area, but our stay was brief and we really only had time for a rainy walk on the beach and to enjoy some entertainment at the hotel.  Since it was the shoulder season the usual movie stars and royalty were somewhere warmer, so senior citizens from all over the world took advantage of the low rates for a luxurious vacation at a lower price.  If you go, be careful there are a lot of older visitors looking for new lovers.

 

Granada

Granada is the capital city of the province of Granada.  Located at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains, at the confluence of four rivers, the Darro, the Genil, the Monachil and the Beiro, it sits at an average elevation of 2,421 ft. above sea level, yet is only one hour by car from the Mediterranean coast.  Nearby is the Sierra Nevada Ski Station, where the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1996 were held.

 

The Alhambra, a Moorish citadel and palace city, is in Granada. It is the most renowned building of the Andalusian Islamic historical legacy with its many cultural attractions that make Granada a popular tourist destination.  It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1984.  It consists of a defensive zone, the Alcazaba, together with others of a residential and formal state character, the Nasrid Palaces and, lastly, the palace, gardens, and orchards of El Generalife.

 

In the 11th century, the Castle of the Alhambra was developed as a walled town which became a military stronghold that dominated the whole city. But it was in the 13th century, with the arrival of the first monarch of the Nasrid dynasty, Mohammed, that the royal residence was established in the Alhambra. This marked the beginning of its heyday. The Alhambra became a palace, citadel, and fortress, and was the residence of the Nasrid sultans and their senior officials, including servants of the court and elite soldiers in the 13th–14th centuries.  In 1492 the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabela, expelled the final Moors from the city of Granada. They established permanent residency in the Alhambra and it was here Christopher Columbus requested royal endorsement for his westward expedition that year.  In 1527 Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor demolished part of the architectural complex to build his palace.  During the French domination, substantial portions of the fortress were blown apart. The repair, restoration, and conservation that continues to this day did not begin until the 19th century.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Generalife is a garden area attached to the Alhambra which became a place of recreation and rest for the Granadan Muslim kings when they wanted to flee the tedium of official life in the Palace.  It was conceived as a rural village, consisting of landscaping, gardens, and architecture.  Today, it’s one of the biggest attractions in the city of Granada. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1984.

 

Toledo

Toledo is a city located in central Spain.  It’s the capital of the province of Toledo and the autonomous community of Castile–La Mancha. Toledo was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986 for its extensive monumental and cultural heritage.  It’s known as the “Imperial City” for having been the main venue of the court of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and as the “City of the Three Cultures” for the cultural influences of Christians, Muslims and Jews reflected in its history. It was also the capital of the ancient Visigothic kingdom of Hispania, which followed the fall of the Roman Empire, and the location of historic events such as the Visigothic Councils of Toledo.

 

Toledo has a long history in the production of bladed weapons, which are now popular souvenirs of the city. The metal-working industry has historically been Toledo’s economic base, with a great tradition in the manufacturing of swords and knives and a significant production of razor blades, medical devices, and electrical products.  The Toledo Blade, the American newspaper in Toledo,  Ohio namesake city, is named in honor of the sword-making tradition.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Cathedral of Toledo (Catedral de Toledo) was built between 1226–1493 and modeled after the Bourges Cathedral, though it also combines some characteristics of the Mudéjar style. It features the Baroque altar built by Narciso Tomé called El Transparente that is several stories high with fantastic figures of stucco, paintings, bronze castings, and multiple colors of marble.  Its name refers to the unique illumination provided by a large skylight cut high up into the thick wall across the ambulatory and another hole cut into the back of the altarpiece itself to allow shafts of sunlight to strike the tabernacle. This lower hole also allows persons in the ambulatory to see through the altarpiece to the tabernacle as if were transparent.

 

I enjoyed the tour I took with Julia Travel, http://juliatravel.com/, and would recommend it to anyone who wants to visit the historic sites of Southern Spain.  Our main tour guide and the others who went with us through some of the sites were knowledgeable and able to answer questions in both English and Spanish.  Other tours joined us along the way and I wished that I’d know that this was an option as I would have liked to visit Portugal and Spain as they did.  I booked it through Viator but may have had more options if I’d known to do it through Julia.  People from other parts of Spain, Mexico, Columbia, Honduras and the U.S. rounded out the tour participants.  We enjoyed great food and a choice of different priced hotels.  I opted for the lower priced ones, but they still had all of the services I wanted and were located in areas convenient to other sites we didn’t visit on the tour.  Even though I dealt with Julia Travel to book my pre-tour hotel in Madrid, I wish I’d known that they picked up and dropped off at another hotel close to mine.  It would have saved me from the scary time in the underground garage and getting a bit lost dragging my suitcase uphill when the tour ended several blocks from the hotel.  The Madrid police were very helpful when I asked them for directions.  After getting my breath back and showing them where I wanted to go on the map, they gave me a police escort until I found the hotel.  I’m currently planning a trip to France and England and I made sure I’m staying at the pick-up hotel.

 

I hope this blog has helped you plan an adventure in Spain.  If you have any travel tips, please comment on them here or on my Facebook Page, Single Boomer Life.

 

Continue the adventure! 

Linda Lea

 

Information from Wikipedia.com